I'm Alive, and I'm Working on a New Project!

So it's been quite a while, and I have no idea how many people will see this post, but I wanted to make a note to show I'm not dead and announce a small project I've been working on. The project idea came from realizing how much history the climate blogosphere has which is largely being forgotten.

I've never viewed myself as a primary actor or researcher in the climate blogosphere, but as a person who's followed it for a long time, I have seen and learned a lot of things I suspect most people have never learned or heard about. I think it's a shame so much information could get forgotten or lost so I've started a project to combat that a bit.

I'm not looking to do anything fancy. My plan is just to create a series of lectures, and possibly accompanying notes, that summarize/document things I feel are important in a digestible format. I'm not looking to immortalize every factoid I've ever learned, but I will be trying to condense some of my many years of reading into a form that's presentable to anyone who might be interested as time goes on.

The first topic I'll be covering is Michael Mann's (in)famous hockey stick. I've worked on a first draft of a script for this lecture, and I've done a first pass at recording it with the tentative title, "Anatomy of a Scam - The Hockey Stick":

As a first pass at a first draft it's obviously very rough, with the most notable problem being the entire ntroduction is missing. The reason I skipped the introduction is the Hockey Stick was incredibly important when it was first published, and I don't know how to convey its influence well. I want to explain how it truly was the figurehead of the global warming movement, but I haven't figure out how to yet (suggestions are selcome).

Without the introduction, this recording doesn't cover the scope/purpose of the video or a basic explanation of what the Hockey Stick is, but I think it is still worth putting online. My hope is I explain some issues most people nowadays aren't aware of clearly and accurately enough to provide an easy "starting point."

To be clear, this is not my normal sort of thing. I can't claim to be any good at making videos or public speaking, but it doesn't seem anyone else is going cover these issues, and I think it's important someone try to. Once I get the script for this one finished I plan to try making visuals for the video and put a finished version online. From there, I'll work on videos for some more issues. I've already begun outlining scripts for several issues:

Stephan Lewandowsky's Fabricated Results
Skeptical Science's Fake "Consensus"
Michael Mann's 2008 Hockey Stick

i may also toy with trying shorter presentations that cover individual aspects of these broader topics. I'm not sure yet. I honestly don't know what demand there will be or how good a job I can do. All I know is, I think it's something worth trying.

And if anyone has feedback on how I can do a better job, I'd love to hear it!

5 comments

  1. One suggestion I've gotten is to consider making shorter videos that cover individual points so more time can be spent on them. Five 10 minute videos may be longer than one 30 minute video, but they may also be more digestible. I'll definitely have to give some thought to how much I want to cover in any given video. Part of it may depend on if I want to treat this as "lectures" in a classic sense or just some sort of YouTube videos.

  2. "One suggestion I've gotten is to consider making shorter videos that cover individual points so more time can be spent on them. Five 10 minute videos may be longer than one 30 minute video, but they may also be more digestible."

    Marvelous idea. Plenty more room for some solid science videos.
    Of course, it's a well-developed field and and the quality standards are pretty high.
    Citations, focus on peer-review, transparency with feedback and corrections etc.
    The usual.
    Nothing you can't handle, I'm sure.

  3. Not bad, but I think the ones you did a number of years back with the graphs were better.

    BTW I hope you're not still sore at me for picking on poor Mark Jacobson whose movie star funded Solutions Project just got $43 million from Jeff Bezos.

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