2012-03-19 13:31:20two on Mars
Sarah
Sarah Green
sarah@inlandsea...
67.142.177.20

I was undecided on this one (undecided/neutral):

Observational Evidence For An Active Surface Reservoir Of Solid Carbon Dioxide On Mars
High-resolution images of the south polar residual cap of Mars acquired in 1999 and 2001 show changes in the configuration of pits, intervening ridges, and isolated mounds. Escarpments have retreated 1 to 3 meters in 1 martian year, changes that are an order of magnitude larger than can be explained by the sublimation of water ice, but close to what is expected for sublimation of carbon dioxide ice. These observations support a 35-year-old conjecture that Mars has a large surface reservoir of solid carbon dioxide. The erosion implies that this reservoir is not in equilibrium with the present environment and that global climate change is occurring on Mars.

This one I called "not climate related/neutral":

Episodes Of Floods In Mangala Valles, Mars, From The Analysis Of Hrsc, Moc And Themis Images
The Mangala Valles is a 900-km long outflow channel system in the highlands adjacent to the southeastern flank of the Tharsis bulge. This work was intended to answer the following two questions unresolved in previous studies: (1) Was there only one source of water (Mangala Fossa at the valley head which is one of the Medusae Fossae troughs or graben) or were other sources also involved in the valley-carving water supply, and (2) Was there only one episode of flooding (maybe with phases) or were there several episodes significantly separated in time. The geologic analysis of HRSC image 0286 and mapping supported by analysis of MOC and THEMIS images show that Mangala Valles was carved by water released from several sources. The major source was Mangala Fossa, which probably formed in response to magmatic dike intrusion. The graben cracked the cryosphere and permitted the release of groundwater held under hydrostatic pressure. This major source was augmented by a few smaller-scale sources at localities in (1) two mapped heads of magmatic dikes, (2) heads of two clusters of sinuous channels, and (3) probably several large knob terrain locals. The analysis of results of crater counts at more than 60 localities showed that the first episode of formation of Mangala Valles occurred similar to 3.5 Ga ago and was followed by three more episodes, one occurred similar to 1 Ga ago, another one similar to 0.5 Ga ago, and the last one similar to 0.2 Ga ago. East of the mapped area there are extended and thick lava flows whose source may be the eastern continuation of the Mangala source graben. Crater counts in 10 localities on these lava flows correlate with those taken on the Mangala valley elements supporting the idea that the valley head graben was caused by dike intrusions. Our observations suggest that the waning stage of the latest flooding episode (similar to 0.2 Ga ago) led to the formation at the valley head of meander-like features sharing some characteristics with meanders of terrestrial rivers. If this analogy is correct this could suggest a short episode of global warming in Late Amazonian time. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2012-03-19 15:48:16and another one
Sarah
Sarah Green
sarah@inlandsea...
67.142.177.20

I'm plagued by Mars today.

I put this one in methods/neutral. 

Global Warming And Climate Forcing By Recent Albedo Changes On Mars
For hundreds of years, scientists have tracked the changing appearance of Mars, first by hand drawings and later by photographs(1,2). Because of this historical record, many classical albedo patterns have long been known to shift in appearance over time. Decadal variations of the martian surface albedo are generally attributed to removal and deposition of small amounts of relatively bright dust on the surface. Large swaths of the surface ( up to 56 million km(2)) have been observed to darken or brighten by 10 per cent or more(3-5). It is unknown, however, how these albedo changes affect wind circulation, dust transport and the feedback between these processes and the martian climate. Here we present predictions from a Mars general circulation model, indicating that the observed interannual albedo alterations strongly influence the martian environment. Results indicate enhanced wind stress in recently darkened areas and decreased wind stress in brightened areas, producing a positive feedback system in which the albedo changes strengthen the winds that generate the changes. The simulations also predict a net annual global warming of surface air temperatures by similar to 0.65 K, enhancing dust lifting by increasing the likelihood of dust devil generation. The increase in global dust lifting by both wind stress and dust devils may affect the mechanisms that trigger large dust storm initiation, a poorly understood phenomenon, unique to Mars. In addition, predicted increases in summertime air temperatures at high southern latitudes would contribute to the rapid and steady scarp retreat that has been observed in the south polar residual ice for the past four Mars years(6-8). Our results suggest that documented albedo changes affect recent climate change and large-scale weather patterns on Mars, and thus albedo variations are a necessary component of future atmospheric and climate studies.

2012-03-19 17:11:17
Andy S

skucea@telus...
209.121.15.232
http://pweb.jps.net/~tgangale/mars/mst/GeologicTimeScales.htm I was previously unaware of the Martian timescale, with "Amazonian" etc. I think that both examples should be "not climate related/neutral" since there is no mention of Earth climate and no link To (or denial) of AGW. I must admit that this exercise has been an eye-opener. It's amazing to me how many soil science and CFC papers there are.
2012-03-19 23:06:31
Sarah
Sarah Green
sarah@inlandsea...
67.142.177.22

I called that last one methods because it discusses albedo changes as affecting climate; neutral because it doesn't say anything about Earth's climate.