2011-08-10 02:03:24Anarchy in the UK
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

It's gone bananas here. Can't say much else really.

Frigging nuts, some arrested are university students according to BBC News 24.

2011-08-10 02:56:28Overpopulation leads to chaos...
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

I recall reading  anumber of years ago about the results of scientific studies of what happens when a  group of rats "overpopulate." The first thing that happens is a complete breakdown of the social order, i.e., chaos. I often wonder if that is not what is happening throughout the world as human populations in a given geographic area become unsustainable.  

2011-08-10 03:26:04
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
188.220.205.42

The Spark was when Mark Duggan, 29, was shot dead by police at Ferry Lane, Tottenham. and 300 peaceful protestors felt his case wasn't being handled fairly.  However, there has to be an environment of lawlessness and perhaps injustice

On Politics.co.uk crime researcher at Civitas Nick Cowen suggests seeing others getting away with it can be enough reason for more:

"The proximate causes of disorder can rarely be determined with any degree of certainty. They emerge almost out of nowhere. But they can spread like wild fires once they have been triggered. Cyclically, an outbreak of aggression makes potential offenders realise they are unlikely, as individuals, to get caught while the police are swamped. So they join in the looting and vandalism - thus making yet more potential offenders confident enough to have a go. Frighteningly, given the right context, a riot can almost become its own cause."

 

2011-08-10 03:59:22
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Sorry perseus but I don't buy the idea about the case being treated unfairly.
The guy was shot what days or hours before? his body was still warm and he was a known gang member I think. I doubt if the police knew exactly what happened.

If you want to know what happened you don't take the family and hundreds of 'peaceful' protestors to the local police station.
There are accepted ways of communicating and finding out.

2011-08-10 04:49:09
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
188.220.205.42

I am unfamiliar with the details, in fact I don't think they have emerged yet, although the police have apologised to the family for poor communication and the case is being looked into by that other IPCC, the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

I'm just stating that 300 peaceful protestors felt his case wasn't being handled fairly, and that was the spark.  Whether they have a case and if London was dowsed in Petrol waiting for that spark is something else.

It a bit like trying to discussing the cause of WW1, there is more to it than a Duke being killed.

2011-08-10 05:36:00
Steve Brown

brownsg@gmail...
80.177.115.133

I live in London and I got seriously hurt in the rioting last night.  I strained my back quite badly while carrying a 42" TV set all the way home from Croydon.

2011-08-10 07:25:40
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Looks like the Blackberry is at the centre of the problem.
Which makes you wonder just how 'poor' these kids are.

My mobile is a hand me down from a relative. I paid £10 for a sim card. I think many Africans probably have a better mobile than me.

I guess if you need to pass messages around covertly between gang members, you need top quality kit.

2011-08-10 07:35:31
nealjking

nealjking@gmail...
84.151.56.171

From what I hear on the BBC, interviews with the looters indicate no remorse or self-doubt at all, just a good opportunity to get some free stuff, and maybe show the police "what for." The claim is that it was a "small minority"; but even so, the father of a non-looter claimed some "sense of perspective" by bringing in the expense-padding by members of Parliament; and the non-looting son said he didn't participate in the rioting partly because "he could always ask his father for all that stuff anyway." Hardly a cheering moral example.

It should be said that not all the rioters were minorities; at least according to the BBC, some were white.

2011-08-10 07:48:48
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

I think one of the problems is that in the UK we have long school holidays especially in the summer. Kids are in their second week of the summer hoiiday and every year, at this time you suddenly have huge numbers of kids out in shopping centres getting used to having a lot of time off. After the first two weeks, they tend to melt into the landscape, but in the first week or two they just have that liberated look. They meet up with their mates and hang out, until they get bored with the novelty or go on holiday with their parents.

There have been plans to have shorter holidays. Something needs to be done to keep them occupied. Having said that, most of the rioters will be known to the police already.

A few years ago in Portsmouth, there was a a big increase of shop thefts that were attributed to this one teenager. Once she was arrested, thefts dropped dramatically.

2011-08-10 08:02:05
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.92.72.61

C'mon Steve, a 42 inch telly is light as! You should have been doing your deadlifts and heavy squats.

Paul D - 10 pound for a sim card? Ouch!. Those things are six bucks here (3 pound), no wonder there's so much looting going on!

In all seriousness though, it gives an insight to a future world as food production continues to dwindle.  

2011-08-10 14:03:56
logicman

logicman_alf@yahoo.co...
86.177.51.236

Latest news is that baseball bats are selling like hot cakes.

It seems that plain folks are getting ready to re-educate the looters, and what with police being seen standing by and just watching the mayhem ....

2011-08-10 17:15:45
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

In all seriousness though, it gives an insight to a future world as food production continues to dwindle. 

Yeah, people will be still looting 42 inch TVs and the supermarkets will be still full of food. That is the logic of society today. You have to have your status symbols.

2011-08-10 18:10:06
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Wikipedia has been updated and we are now listed in the list of 2011 riots:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_riots

Added:

Top riot of 2011 maybe?
At least based on shear size and area, maybe not on fatalities.

2011-08-10 18:15:34
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

I Predict a Riot by the Kaiser Chiefs, good video actually:

http://youtu.be/hamKl-su8PE

Maybe it could be re-released, assuming the track survived the burning down of the Sony warehouse. Number one within hours of release.

2011-08-10 19:15:36
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
188.220.205.42

Seems that putting 16,000 police in London worked last night, what a surprise. One community leader who teaches boxing to disadvantaged youths managed to keep his group of the streets.  What are the Government doing?  Cutting police and community funding.

2011-08-10 19:30:04
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.248.92

Yeah, but the number of frontline Police they are cutting is an eye-opener - 34,000! 

2011-08-10 19:59:25
Dikran Marsupial
Gavin Cawley
gcc@cmp.uea.ac...
139.222.14.107

The police cuts are another indication of what is wrong with our society.  We want services, but we don't want to pay for them (tax); a large part of the reason for the current austerity measures (such as ctiing front line police numbers) is because we have run up a large debt by minimising taxes, but not spending.  This indicates selfish short term thinking, which doesn't bode well for action against global warming, which is fairly low down on most peoples agendas.

No, I'm not part of the communist secret plot for one world government, I just know that you get what you pay for, and if you want policemen, you have to have taxes to pay them.

2011-08-11 03:23:21
jyyh
Otto Lehikoinen
otanle@hotmail...
85.77.128.43

remembered a relative mentioning Islington a while back, it was her second cousin (or such, don't really know her) living near by, got home safely 22.30sh and called for military at facebook, clearly it's been bad.

2011-08-11 03:56:49Seems as though...
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

the fabrics of Western democracies are being shredded. Carrried to its extreme, Libertarinism is nothing more than anarchy. The super-rich no longer need the masses to do manual labor. Therefore, if the masses wind-up killing each other, it's no big deal. 

2011-08-11 04:50:37
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
188.220.205.42

I think we have to get this into perspective, there are only a minority of inner city areas which have been affected so far, it isn't a state of emergency over the entire country.  However, the government (or the previous one) aren't taking the blame, its all sound-bites about 'mindless thugs' but why have these suddenly appeared out of nowhere?  They are around all the time, its just that certain social environments make them more prevalent. 

It is like a virus in a unhygienic physical environment.  For years it can stay relatively subdued, then an event such as hot weather causes it escalate.  It will then eventually peak then decline, until another outbreak starts at some undetermined time in the future.  The only way to stop it reoccuring is to clean the environment up so the viruses can't get out of control.

2011-08-11 05:18:49
Andy S

skucea@telus...
66.183.179.249

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad calls on the British police to exercise restraint with the rioters. A sentiment echoed by Moscow and Beijing.

2011-08-11 06:41:54
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

British Riots: Elites "Shocked" The Poor Are Rising Up Against Brutal Austerity Measures

By Laurie Penny, AlterNet
Posted on August 9, 2011, Printed on August 10, 2011
http://www.alternet.org/story/151952/british_riots%3A_elites_%22shocked%22_the_poor_are_rising_up_against_brutal_austerity_measures

 

This article is crossposted on Laurie Penny's blog, Penny Red.

2011-08-11 08:15:33
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Politics of a burning building??
Typical socialist twaddle.
There was a similar blog post on the Guardian recently by a pompous socialist blaming cuts. It's the same old left/right politics which has no future.

What is stupid is cutting back the police force when you know hard times are ahead and crime is likely to go up.

 

2011-08-11 08:18:17
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.92.58.197

Yes Paul, actual crime will go up, but reported crime might actually fall, because there'll be less Police to actually take the report, people will get pissed off waiting and decide it's not worth the bother. 

2011-08-11 08:25:16
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.92.58.197

Badger - that Penny Red blog is just plain stupid. 

"Violence is rarely mindless" -   Uh huh.....it was all part of a cunning plan was it?

2011-08-11 20:31:24
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

The reality is coming in through news reports about rioters, examples:

School teaching assistant, daughter of a millionaire who lives in a country mansion, uncle turns in his niece to the police because he thought she had new clothes, I dare say we will have a long list as the hundredrs arrested are processed by the magistrates.

2011-08-11 21:40:15
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.92.71.146

Paul, I figured a lot of people would be surprised by make-up of the looters. As is typical, many just assumed they were all career criminals, and blithely ignored the mob mentality aspect. Yup, most were garden variety shitbags, but not all. 

2011-08-11 23:22:02
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
188.220.205.42

Well the Greater Manchester Police are ready

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1b74BdPfSQ

now what does that remind me of, oh yes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6HS6jyxoFE&feature=player_detailpage

 

2011-08-12 00:56:41
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Must have been last year that I found some kids in our town centre, they appeared to be trying to break off a bit of the public telephone booth. They were only about 11 or 12 and it was early evening in the summer (still very light). Some food vendors were open but as far as I could tell the staff weren't doing anything to stop the kids. So I took my ancient mobile phone out and made sure the kids saw me pretending to dial and I made some un-approving looks.

They soon moved on. I wasn't sure about go to them and talking to them. They were young, but there were about 3 or 4 of them.

Another time a teenager was drinking a beer on the bus on Sat morning, and the bus was full, including young kids. So I went to the bus driver and told him about it. He stopped the bus and gave the teenager a choice of getting off or giving up the beer and staying on. He gave up the beer and the driver threw it into a roadside bin, and carried on as normal.

Those produced results. The problem is older 'kids' in their late teens or in their twenties. They can be difficult and probably more dangerous to tackle, even if you are within your rights. Also it's a different matter at night no matter what age!

2011-08-12 01:52:54
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Perseus I thought the police officer who dived in front of the cyclist was imppresive, must of hurt the cyclist yob more than the police officer.

2011-08-12 02:18:08Before you all get carried about the demonizing the rioters...
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

I suggest that you take a look at the factors which caused the race riots throughout the Us in the 1970s.  The maldistribution of wealth among the British population is not susttainable.

2011-08-12 04:02:42Cameron’s Broken Windows -- NY Times Blog Post
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

Cameron’s Broken Windows

OUR son lives next to a Turkish mosque on Kingsland Road in Hackney, where some of London’s worst mob violence has occurred. When looters rampaged through Hackney last weekend, there were few police officers to stop them and residents had to chase them off with butcher knives, truncheons and baseball bats. Vigilante action succeeded where normal policing failed.

Kingsland Road resembles the bustling, ethnically mixed streets of Brooklyn. During the day, it is a home of sorts for unemployed young men with nothing to do; Britain’s youth unemployment rate is currently over 20 percent. During the economic boom a decade ago, though, nearly as many were out of work, and they did not all turn to crime.

To counter the risk that they might, there were storefront drop-in centers for young people in the neighborhood; these places are now shutting down, as are other community services, like health centers for the elderly and libraries. Local police forces have also been shrinking.

All are victims of what people in Britain call “the cuts” — the government’s defunding of civil-society institutions in order to balance the nation’s books. Before the riots, the government had planned to cut 16,200 police officers across the country. In London, austerity means that there will be about 19 percent less to spend next year on government programs, and the burden will fall particularly on the poor.

The rioters in London appear to be young men of varying races — despite reports of a monolithic mob of alienated “black youth.” But there is a racial dimension to this drama. The wave of riots began with protests against the police killing of a young black man, Mark Duggan. While initially peaceful, the demonstrations soon descended into violence. When the unrest spread to Manchester on Tuesday, many of the rioters there were apparently white.

An old-fashioned Marxist might imagine that the broken windows and burning houses expressed a raging political reaction to government spending cuts — but this time that explanation would be too facile.

The last time Britain saw widespread rioting, in the 1980s, street violence came after a long and failed political struggle against the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher, which suppressed trade unions and decimated social services. Today, the rioters seem motivated by a more diffuse anger, behaving like crazed shoppers on a spree; while some of the shops looted are big chains, many more are small local businesses run by people who are themselves struggling through Britain’s economic slump.

There has been a change in national temperament that has affected decent citizens as well as criminals. The country’s mood has turned sour. Indeed, the flip side of Britons’ famed politeness is the sort of hooliganism that appears at soccer matches and in town centers on weekend nights — an unfocused hostility that is usually fueled by vast quantities of alcohol. Fears of anarchic urban mobs date from Shakespeare’s time, and Prime Minister David Cameron has summoned these old fears, describing the present conflagration as “senseless.”

Mr. Cameron was good at selling people on the idea of cutting costs, but he has failed to make the case for what and how to cut: efforts to increase university fees, to overhaul the National Health Service, to reduce the military and the police, even to sell off the nation’s forests, have all backfired, with the government hedging or simply abandoning its plans.

In attempting to carry out reform, the government appears incompetent; it has lost legitimacy. This has prompted some people living on Kingsland Road to become vigilantes. “We have to do things for ourselves,” a 16-year-old in Hackney told The Guardian, convinced that the authorities did not care about, or know how to protect, communities like his.

A street of shuttered shops, locked playgrounds and closed clinics, a street patrolled by citizens armed with knives and bats, is not a place to build a life.

Americans ought to ponder this aspect of Britain’s trauma. After all, London is one of the world’s wealthiest cities, but large sections of it are impoverished. New York is not so different.

The American right today is obsessed with cutting government spending. In many ways, Mr. Cameron’s austerity program is the Tea Party’s dream come true. But Britain is now grappling with the consequences of those cuts, which have led to the neglect and exclusion of many vulnerable, disaffected young people who are acting out violently and irresponsibly — driven by rage rather than an explicit political agenda.

America is in many ways different from Britain, but the two countries today are alike in their extremes of inequality, and in the desire of many politicians to solve economic and social ills by reducing the power of the state.

Britain’s current crisis should cause us to reflect on the fact that a smaller government can actually increase communal fear and diminish our quality of life. Is that a fate America wishes upon itself?

Richard Sennett is a professor of sociology at the London School of Economics and New York University. Saskia Sassen is a professor of sociology at Columbia.

2011-08-12 04:42:27
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
188.220.205.42

Paul

I'm not convinced the riots are the product of any recent cuts, however all this is set against a background of mass unbridled consumerism where youths are deluged by advertisers to buy the latest fads, celebrities can be paid all out of proportion to their talent, bankers get immense bonuses for nearly bankrupting the nation, and even the very custodians of law and order, the Police and Politicians have been found guilty of corruption and expense fiddling respectively. Is it suprising that what was probably a police blunder, escalated into a 'grab what you can' around the country? 

To blame the youths or their Parents might be partly justified, but Cameron is still evading any policy or fiscal issue for soundbites.  Policy issues which need addressing include: paying for more police on the streets, tougher sentences and paying for officers and jails, paying for more clubs and societies which will occupy these youths, paying for better schooling.  If we can't afford it, then the diversion of funds from the parents of these criminals should be used to support these costs. 

2011-08-12 05:36:58
Andy S

skucea@telus...
66.183.179.249

London rioters: 'Showing the rich we do what we want'

Acts of mindless, drunken vandalism by David Cameron and Boris Johnson: showing the poor that rich people can also do what they want.

Sometimes I have nostaligic regrets about having left the UK for a life in Canada. Other times, not so much.

2011-08-12 07:06:52Anarchy in the UK -- The Nation Magazine
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

Anarchy in the UK

Maria Margaronis | August 9, 2011

London

Perhaps the whole point of a riot is to defy explanation: it’s an eruption of the irrational, a shattering of glass and boundaries, a testosterone-fueled roar that briefly flips anger and emptiness into something like ecstasy. What’s in the minds of the young men (and women, too) in London, Birmingham, Bristol and Liverpool who’ve sent great sheets of flame rising into the August night, devouring local businesses [1] that it took years to build; who’ve turned plate glass to spiderwebs with one crack of a brick; who’ve gone home with their backpacks stuffed with cell phones, Nike trainers, X-boxes and Wiis? Well, wouldn’t we like to know, we middle-class types with access to a blog and an analysis, a “network” and a future?

Today Prime Minister David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson returned reluctantly from their  vacations to confront the arson and looting that have spread through Britain's cities over the last three nights, like a pair of Eton prefects summoned to contain the fifth form. Parliament has been recalled for the second time this summer (the first was over phone hacking by Murdoch’s News International); 450 people have already been arrested; Cameron has promised 6,000 more police on London’s streets this evening. But will it be enough?

Missy, who works at a small shop selling jeans and sneakers down the road from where I live, shrugs when I ask her what she’s going to do tonight. The metal grille was down and properly locked yesterday; "they" trashed the place anyway. “They know the shop,” she says. “They went straight upstairs where we keep the expensive stuff, the £300 jeans.” A few blocks on, outside a smashed-up cycle shop where twisted bikes lie like skeletons on the pavement, a forensic expert carefully dusts glass with fingerprint powder. Does she think she’ll find anything? Another shrug. In Dalston, next to Hackney which saw some of the worst rioting, the Turkish Kurdish community have taken charge [2] themselves, standing guard outside their shops, some of them with baseball bats.

The blue touchpaper that lit the conflagration [3] was the killing of Mark Duggan, a 29-year-old black father of four, by armed police in Tottenham, one of London's poorest boroughs, as he rode in a minicab; he had a handgun but there’s been no claim that he made a move to fire it. A small crowd of local residents gathered at the police station to demand explanations; though the protesters were peaceful, the police were not forthcoming. By nightfall, against the wishes of Duggan’s relatives, rioting had broken out in Tottenham and elsewhere. Police cars and a double decker bus were set on fire and shop windows were smashed, mostly by teenage boys.

What began as an outburst of anger against police violence soon morphed into an orgy of nocturnal “shopping” as kids broke into sports and electronics shops, cellphone stores and supermarkets. A brave woman in Hackney gave a streetcorner sermon [4] amid heaps of litter, excoriating the rioters for turning grief to greed: “This is about a fucking man who got shot in Tottenham. This isn’t about having fun on a riot and busting up the place. Get real, black people, get real. If we’re fighting for a cause let’s fight for a fucking cause.” But in the deprived neighbourhoods of Britain’s crumbling cities, consumerism is a more accessible dream than commitment or community.

And so it has gone on, night after night since then, frightening, unpredictable and uncontainable. The police are overwhelmed [5]; the politicians nervously continue to plough their furrows. “Sheer criminality,” says Home Secretary Teresa May, as if any attempt to understand what’s at the root of all this rage would imply condoning it. Labour politicians flirt with the temptation to blame government spending cuts, as if such fury could build up in a matter of mere months. Of course the cuts don’t help: they are the final straw, the irrefutable evidence that the poor are now dispensable, outside society. Nor does the larger sense that nobody’s in charge, that the economy’s in freefall, that bankers have been looting the public purse for years, and that our leaders have no idea what to do about any of it. There is a doomsday feeling on the streets of London: time to grab what you can, burn it down and live for now, because who knows what’s coming for us all tomorrow.

But it’s taken years to brew the toxic mix of hopelessness, frustration and disenfranchisement, envy, anger and boredom, greed [6] and selfishness, humiliation and recklessness that’s erupted in Britain this week--years in which the gap between rich and poor grew wider, racism was allowed to fester, consumerism and celebrity culture replaced community. While we in the middle classes got on with our oh-so-busy lives, averting our eyes from the poverty just a few blocks away, sending our kids to schools where there are other “motivated parents,” talking politics, we allowed the rifts in our own neighbourhoods to deepen until they became almost unbridgeable.

This morning, down the road, people stared at the broken shops, shaking their heads in disbelief. “It’s mad,” they said. “Just mad.” Small groups of women set out with brooms and dustpans to sweep up the broken glass. There is a kind of solidarity taking shape, a wish to protect what we have, now that it’s under threat. People are talking to each other, asking if everything's all right. The challenge, when all this dies down, will be to stay awake, to keep on doing that, until solidarity spreads.


Links:
[1] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2023975/London-riots-2011-House-Reeves-independent-family-furniture-shop-razed-ground-rioters-Croydon.html
[2] http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/video/2011/aug/09/london-riots-london
[3] http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/aug/07/tottenham-riots-peaceful-protest?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487
[4] http://www.twitvid.com/4JTZH
[5] http://wintsays.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/tottenham-enfield-brixton-polcing-and-public-disorder
[6] http://boos.audioboo.fm/attachments/1441622/leana-hosea-speaks-to-croydon-looters.mp3?audio_clip_id=434411

2011-08-12 07:40:45
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

The riots can't be blamed on cuts. There is a lot of left and right rhetoric about this. It's pretty boring especially when you here stories about parents saying they don't know where their kids are. I was listening to a father saying his son had gone to bed and he had as well, his son then went out while he was asleep and there wasn't much he could do.

Well yes there was. How the fuck did he get to a stage where his son secretly went out at night???
From what I remember the son was under 16. Let me guess, the son has a top range mobile phone because he had to have one, because his mates have one as well, so the dad gave in and bought it. His son got a message from his mates that there was a rumble down town.

His dad could afford the mobile because he shops in Tescos and buys the cheapest food which was imported from all around the planet.

Ok, it's speculation, but it's based on a lot of observation.

2011-08-12 07:51:44
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-14497763

A message on the "Let's Do Something Nice For Asyraf Haziq" site said just less than £4,000 had been donated by Wednesday night.

On Wednesday, footage of the student recalling his ordeal from his hospital bed was posted online by a friend.

In it, he said his attackers "threatened to stab me, they told me they had knives".

He added: "Some of them were quite young, maybe still in primary school. They had their hoods on and demanded my bicycle."

2011-08-12 07:59:19
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14495104

Saffron Armstrong tried to explain that he had gone into a looted computer store because he was inquisitive - and a freelance journalist...The 22-year-old pleaded guilty to burglary.

The accounting student from Mitcham, who also worked for Marks and Spencer, was remorseful and admitted his intentions had "not been for the best".

The 17-year-old girl, whose lawyer said wanted to be a dancer, was accused of stealing two televisions from the Richer Sounds store in Croydon on Monday.

Another woman, a graduate and aspiring social worker, also handed herself into police the day after stealing a £300 television from a Comet store in Enfield.

The unemployed cannabis user from Roehampton admitted buying £248 of sports clothes from a "crack head" for £50 - items which had been looted from JD Sports in Clapham Junction the previous night.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/boy-12-among-looters-in-court-2335816.html

Kumail Rizvi, 19, a computer studies student at Manchester Metropolitan University, pleaded guilty to burglary after stealing two bangles and three rings worth £690 from the Links of London shop in Manchester and was sent to Crown Court for sentencing.

2011-08-12 08:14:45
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

Just saw on TV some reporters outside the house of a rioters parents home. They didn't look very poverty stricken, the father was well built and the house looked like a typical middle class suburban house.

Actually there is something somewhat liberating that these idiots in communities are being exposed. I hope there is more of it. Most of the time we all have to put up with their antisocial behaviour. I'm sure they will have a lot to think about over the months and years. Maybe they will actually start being parents.