2011-07-13 08:58:14An idea to help out those new to the climate change issue...
Rob Honeycutt

robhon@mac...
121.10.1.66

We use lots and lots and LOTS of acronyms and shorthand in this debate.  I still get caught from time to time with a new one.

How about we run a list of them down the side of the page?  It might help SkS become a more "sticky" location for new users.

2011-07-13 09:03:00
Riccardo

riccardoreitano@tiscali...
93.147.82.157

The climate alphabet, good idea Rob. It will be tedious but can be filled little by little.

2011-07-13 09:07:16
Rob Honeycutt

robhon@mac...
121.10.1.66

Nice, sticky title too!  "Alphabet Soup."

2011-07-13 13:42:28A cautionary note
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

I am not keen on the idea because excessive visual clutter also negatively impacts users.

Perhaps a "fine" system should be imposed on authors.

The first time an acronym appers in an article it should be in paranthesis after the item is stated in words, e.g., "Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)."  Every time an author falls to follow this rule, he/she should be required to donate $5.00 to SkS. 

2011-07-13 16:12:30Glossary
John Cook

john@skepticalscience...
121.222.9.229

Doug's initial concept of the glossary was that any phrases in the glossary that appeared in articles would be hyperlinked - mousing over the word would cause a popup window with a short definition - possibly with a link to a more full definition. This is something that could be explored if we continue down the glossary road.

2011-07-13 17:37:13
Paul D

chillcast@googlemail...
82.18.130.183

How about putting it on a page and then linking it to the drop down resources menu?

John I think the technical term for the hyperlink and pop up window is 'TOOLTIPS' ;-)

Can this be done automatically?
 I guess the problem would be if an Acronym was mistaken for a real verb or noun.

2011-07-13 21:35:42
Glenn Tamblyn

glenn@thefoodgallery.com...
124.176.190.107

I just made a comment over on the old thread about glossaries started by Doug. Then this comment appears. Serendipity anyone.

This is just a single example of how the growth of SkS means we need a range of structures fairly quickly

2011-07-14 00:42:31Glenn
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

Please note that "Create a SkS Glossary of scientific terms" appears in the long list of "To Dos" being assembled in:  

Fleshing out the "Long list of SkS To Do's" -- Assistance requested 

If you have not already done so, please peruse this thread andprovide feedback.

2011-07-14 00:46:24Glossary
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

An SkS Glossary should, by design, include more than just acronyms. In fact, it should be labeled, "SKS Glossary of scientific terms and acronyms.

 

2011-07-14 01:04:22Short-term action plan
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

While we wrestle with the technical issues of implementing a way to link scientific terms and acronyms to defintions, why don't we just bite the bullet and commit to developing the Glossary itself?

Here are the steps needed to get us started:

1, John Cook creates a new SkS webpage for the Glossary. (The webpage would not be public until  

2. Dana imports an exisitng glossary from an appropriate international or national organiztion. (There is absolutely no need for us to start from scratch.)

3. SkS authors review the contents of the Glossary and recommend changes where needed. Are the terms/acronymes defined correctly? (The conrtents of any exisitng glossary may be a tad dated.)  

4. In parallel with step 3, SkS authors review the contents of the Glossay and recommend additions.

5. Close-out the review/comment period within 30-days, and move the Glossary into the public domain -- even if the techy stuff is not fully resovled. Most SkS users will be adroit enough to use a glossary the old-fashioned way.