2011-05-20 23:11:23Big clue to future climate change in small plants
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.68.19

Now yarrow--and 12 other grassland species, including Indian grass, thimbleweed and wild lupine--may have a larger role, scientists have found: as players in Earth's .

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and University of Minnesota-Twin Cities conducted an 11-year experiment with 13 plant species common in U.S. Midwestern states.

The scientists added extra carbon dioxide (CO2) to the plants' environment to discover how--in the higher carbon dioxide world of global warming--the plants would respond.

The results suggest that plants' capacity to absorb extra carbon from the atmosphere as CO2 levels rise may be less than expected.

The findings are published in the current issue of the journal .

Source: http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-05-big-clue-future-climate-small.html

2011-05-20 23:22:51They're everywhere!
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.68.19

The following post by the professional climate denier blogger, mememine69, on the comment thread to this article is sublimely ridiculous.

"The thousands of consensus scientists can study the effects of something that hasnt happened yet for another 25 years, or forever, it still wont make the climate change crisis true. Yes we DO study the projected effects of climate change on the planet. There is billions donated to scientists by politicians who make it look like they are doing something for you, liberal and conservative. So the scientists are busy studying and speculating what the heating effects will look like. But just as there are tropical fossils under the ice, calling all bad weather our fault, gives the social psychotics of witch burning, omen worship, paganism, superstition and sacrificing virgins, a new meaner brother by the name of climate change." 

2011-05-21 02:07:41NSF News Release
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.68.19

The above article is based upon a USF press release.

http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=119583&org=NSF&from=newsDoes

Should the findings of this particular study be the subject of an SkS blog post?