2011-03-05 06:29:44Daniel Bailey draws Ljungqvist into the comments section...
Rob Honeycutt

robhon@mac...
98.207.62.223

Nice work, Daniel!

2011-03-05 06:34:11Heh
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
yooper49855@hotmail...
97.83.150.102

Fish on!

2011-03-05 07:36:54Doh, I skimmed the thread this morning and somehow overlooked his comments
John Cook

john@skepticalscience...
124.186.229.6
In my defence, it was before my morning cup of coffee.

I know his work is cited by skeptics but does anyone know if Ljungqvist himself is a skeptic?

2011-03-05 07:47:11Comment
Robert Way

robert_way19@hotmail...
134.153.163.105

Not to take away from the fun but I had every intention of asking him the hard questions.

2011-03-05 07:49:54Comment
Robert Way

robert_way19@hotmail...
134.153.163.105

Ljungqvist is not a skeptic. He works with Moberg. Ljungqvists work is okay but not great and is very dependent on tree-rings. He's very okay with the publicity he gets from the skeptic community and I've had a few climatologists comment back to me when talking about him that they really thought it was weird that in his reconstruction he did not tack on the instrumental record up to the 2000s. I have my doubts in his work personally and there are a lot in the field who wonder what game is he trying to play.

But no, he's not a skeptic, he's just got some characteristics that are dare I say "curry-ish"

2011-03-05 08:15:31
perseus

owlsmoor@googlemail...
78.143.222.113

Here are some abstracts from his latest papers

"......The temperature of the last two decades, however, is possibly higher than during any previous time in the past two millennia, although this is only seen in the instrumental temperature data and not in the multi-proxy reconstruction itself. Our temperature reconstruction agrees well with the reconstructions by Moberg et al. (2005) and Mann et al. (2008) with regard to the amplitude of the variability as well as the timing of warm and cold periods, except for the period c. ad 300–800, despite significant differences in both data coverage and methodology."

2011-03-05 08:26:10
nealjking

nealjking@gmail...
91.33.98.95

He seems to be an interesting character:

"Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist is Secretary for the Center of Medieval Studies at Stockholm University, Sweden, and is a medieval historian and climate researcher. He has published a number of articles in both medieval history and palaeoclimatology and written a book about how climate changes have affected human societies during history. Currently, he is writing a PhD thesis on the ideology of kingskip in the medieval Scandinavian laws."