2011-07-02 02:07:16Denier tactic
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

While doing a background check on the American Clean Skies Foundation in Sourcewatch, I came across the following. It speaks to a well-used denier tactic. I am not suggesting that we use it. i am merely bring ing it to everyone's attention. 

Mission Statement as Propaganda

The American Clean Skies Foundation was formed to educate the American public about clean energy- particularly natural gas and other clean fuels such as wind and solar- and about the need for greater energy efficiency, and for any other exclusively religious, charitable, scientific, literary and educational purpose included within the meaning of section 501(c) (3) of the Internal revenue Code of 1986 or the corresponding section of any future tax code (the "Code")

Derrick Jensen and others have pointed out that an element of successful propaganda is if the creators of the message can slide their premises by the audience, without their noticing. So when a Nazi sympathizer asks the question, "What are we going to do about the Jewish problem?", if you answer, he has won, because he has gotten you to accept the premise that a) there is a Jewish problem, and b) something should be done about it. It looks like a question, but it is actually propaganda.

Similarly, we normally don't think about a mission statement as being propaganda, but notice well this part:

The American Clean Skies Foundation was formed to educate the American public about clean energy- particularly natural gas and other clean fuels....

OK, clean fuels. That's all good. But why mention natural gas here at all? Why not just say "we want to educate about clean fuels" and let the science show what that is? How did they decide a priori that natural gas was "clean energy"? Is this a natural fact which no one disputes? Or is there controversy and doubt about this claim? (A: There is controversy around this claim!) Do the creators of this so-called charitable foundation have financial connections to the gas industry? (Yes, they do!)