2011-12-31 05:34:312011 year in review (pt2) - work in progress
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

Link.

 

It's a work in progress, the titles give the idea of my overall plan. Comments are welcome as we go along!

2011-12-31 07:22:06CERN
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
64.129.227.4

Link for the CERN section.

2012-01-02 06:18:55
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

Added your link, Dana. This is getting real hard to do right, it had swollen to about 1800 words and I hadn't even touched on Spencer and methane. I've tightened the language and it's back around 1300, but still got to finish methane and do Spencer. Will try and finish it tomorrow, I need a break now but would appreciate comments!

2012-01-02 23:00:17
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

All sections except for cloud cover (Spencer/Trenberth/Dessler stuff) done. Would appreciate comments on the other stuff.

2012-01-03 02:30:05
Ari Jokimäki

arijmaki@yahoo...
91.154.97.114

"...2005 and 2010 as discusse by Rob Painting here."

discusse -> discussed

"This has been seen before (e.g. Nicolas et al, 2011, Kiritani, 2011, Yamano, Sugihara & Nomura, 2011), and now Chen et al (2011) have shown that faster warming means faster migration, sowing that the warming-migration link is solid."

I think sowing is not the action you're looking for here. In this poleward migration section it might be good to mention also that even if the species can move fast enough, sometimes they can't migrate because there's something preventing them (an ocean, mountain doesn't go any higher,...). By the way, recently there was an interesting paper about California valley oaks which apparently do not migrate poleward or higher, but instead they concentrate around water bodies. With that in mind, perhaps it might be good to first express the situation more generally, i.e. that the migration happens towards more suitable environments, which just in many cases happens to be polewards and upwards.

On cosmic ray section, here you can find couple of other 2011 papers about it (latest of them came out last week). In this section you have written "Skepticalscience" but correct form is "Skeptical Science".

"We also expect wet areas get wetter, dryer ones to get dryer and heavy rain and snowfalls to get heavier."

There's a brand new paper out on this that you can use as reference: abstract, full text.

For methane section, there are some possible additional references here (sorry, the article is in Finnish but you can find the references in the end). Little bit different, but interesting and important in my opinion, view on methane is offered in this 2011 paper.

"We we were already confident..."

One we too much.

2012-01-03 23:51:36
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

Most of your suggestions included Ari.

I missed out the oaks one because I wanted to keep it flowing. I was desperate to keep it short enough to read and I already cut out 800 words and some pics.

 

 

I think this is now ready, but it needs to be checked. There are some potentially contentious things in there (the last point in the clouds section could be interpreted as an ad hominem against Spencer, but I'm convinced it's an important point and that I focussed on the science first).

Also, my knowledge is pretty general so I expect I missed something specicalists would pick out.

2012-01-04 06:21:50Suggested revision to introductory paragaprhs
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

Your introductory paragraphs now read:

In Part 1 we explored 2011's harvest of climate data. It's now possible for anyone reading this to see the measurements showing that the atmosphere and oceans are warming, that ice is melting and the seas are rising.

2011 saw some criticisms of the temperature record put to the test and it turned out to be a triumphant year for the scientists who'd measured and reported global warming. Now we'll explore a few of the more cutting edge parts of climate science in 2011.

Suggested revision:

This is the second part of a two-part article summarizing what we learned about manmade climate change and climate science during 2011. In Part 1 we explored 2011's harvest of climate measurements showing that the atmosphere and oceans are warming, that ice is melting and the seas are rising. 2011 saw some criticisms of the temperature record put to the test, and it turned out to be a triumphant year for the scientists who'd measured and reported global warming. Now, in Part 2, we'll explore a few of the more cutting-edge parts of climate science in 2011.

  
2012-01-04 16:19:04
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
71.137.110.252

FYI if you do a graphics Part 3, John is putting together an animated GIFs page, and a cartoons page too.

2012-01-05 05:41:19
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

Edited first paragraph to be more in line with what John said.

 

Don't think I'll have time to do part 3, I'm back at work now and very busy!

2012-01-05 06:20:15
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
64.129.227.4

Part 2 looks good Mark.  Ready to publish it tomorrow?

2012-01-05 07:57:42One last tweak
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.98.161

The first sentence of the third paragraph uner the Conclusions section reads:

"I'd say that 2011 has had 2 good outcomes."

Change to:

"2011 had two good outcomes."

2012-01-09 03:17:13
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

I incorporated that, and I think it's ready to go. Would like more opinion on the Spencer comment though - I think it's a good point to make but it could be interpreted as ad hominem.

2012-01-09 05:12:57
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
71.137.110.252

The absolute faith comment?  I could see it either way - I'd suggest removing it just because it's not really relevant to the year in review, more of a critique of Spencer, which isn't really relevant to his research.

2012-01-09 20:47:12
MarkR
Mark Richardson
m.t.richardson2@gmail...
134.225.187.225

Changed.