2011-05-17 01:31:47Hooks, Roles, and the Climate Change Blame Game
grypo

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Hooks, Roles, and the Climate Change Blame Game

 

This post relies heavily on Bud Ward's email corresopondence and writings on his Yale blog.  he has okay'd it :)

2011-05-17 01:51:43
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
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"Or did Emanual Emanuel mean..."

"Nonetheless, since recognizing and moving beyond the issues and moving beyond is expected..."

Do you have any suggestions as to how each side can help resolve the problem of communicating the problem to the public?  As the post stands now, you report on the problem, but don't propose any solutions to it.  Personally I don't know how to solve it, but if you have any ideas, the post is set up well to communicate them at the end.

Another thing that struck me was this Petit comment:

"All this new one says is that that if we don’t do something fast the world as we know it will probably end and the next one won’t be fun. Well, not in so many words, but blah blah blah....True, but not new."

That the media doesn't see reports of potentially catastrophic climate change as worth reporting on because they're not new is a major problem.  It's never going to be new again, yet we're not doing anything serious about because the public isn't convinced it's a serious problem, in large part because the media is so blah about it.  It's a Catch-22 with the media not reporting because the public sees it as 'blah', and the public seeing it as 'blah' because the media isn't adequately reporting on it.  It might be worth talking about this in the post.

My NRC report post is now live if you want to link it.

2011-05-17 02:09:42
grypo

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I don't have any real answers here.  the only one is where I think the disconnect should become part of the discourse. I'll expand on that tho because it's hidden.  I'll also look for what others have said.  i think i'll email Micheal Tobis too.  He frequesntly discusses this subject

2011-05-20 23:33:04
grypo

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Ok, I've done a new draft here.  I've included different solution ideas from Stephen Leahy and scientists/policy expert Jonathan Gilligan.  i have an email out to another outspoken scientist, but it appears I'm not getting an answer back.

2011-05-21 02:00:28
Riccardo

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In case some of you don't know or forgot, I'm a scientist and as such I'm commenting here. This premise/disclaimer is to anticipate that I'm going to be blunt and even rude.

Once upon a time there's was a world where the Presidents of the United States and politicians on both sides of the aisle were listening to the Academy of Sciences on science related issues. But than came the merchants of doubt. With a huge flow of money and the hope of fame it was easy to hire a cohort of journalists to spread their words.

Now, using Stephen Leahy words "news media today is filled with non-jurnos, op eds posing as articles, and people paid to push a point of view. It takes a good BS detector to find real journalism and most people don't have one. "

One thing should be clear and is apparently missing in this post as well as in the AAAS panel discussion: the problem did not start on the scientists side. I'm a bit tired of this blame game and the following endless discussions. We may, and should, discuss how to solve the problem and the scientific community may and should help. But there must be a preliminary statement which frame the problem we are confronting, the merchants of doubts and their hired journalists. Without it we're fighting windmills.
The fire is in the news media's house. I'll help, but don't blame me if it took fire.

One last thing. If a NAS report inspires "a collective yawn from the media", it's just their rush for breaking news; I've been yawning for years reading their (to me) semi-absurd discussions. And if they think they should get more exciting news from scientists they should follow Holliwood stars, not scientists. I propose to make them follow the daily work in a lab for a few months. I'm sure they'd find it terribly boring and would turn their attention to something else. Sometimes I even think it would be beneficial.

Sorry mates, I'm afraid I can't be of any help with this post or this issue in general :)

2011-05-21 02:03:16
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
64.129.227.4

I think before you launch into it, the very beginning could use a little introduction, to set up what you're going to talk about in the post.  Something about communicating climate science to the public, and whether the onus is on scientists or the media.  Something like the first paragraph in the Blame Game section.  Other than that it looks pretty good.

2011-05-21 03:10:44
grypo

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173.69.56.151

Sorry mates, I'm afraid I can't be of any help with this post or this issue in general :)

Actually, I think this line is good

the problem did not start on the scientists side. I'm a bit tired of this blame game and the following endless discussions. We may, and should, discuss how to solve the problem and the scientific community may and should help. But there must be a preliminary statement which frame the problem we are confronting, the merchants of doubts and their hired journalists. Without it we're fighting windmills. The fire is in the news media's house. I'll help, but don't blame me if it took fire.

But I would also say that the journalists could point to Spencer and Micheals as scientists who assist the merchants of doubt.  But your thoughts are good, in the sense that science is a slow moving machine that will vanquish the ideas of these contrarian scientists, the media does not have this kind of review system.  

2011-05-24 01:33:48
grypo

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173.69.56.151

This is all set I believe.

2011-05-24 02:01:49
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
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64.129.227.4

Agreed, I've got it on the schedule for tomorrow.