2011-05-10 22:56:08Science and Religion: Allies on Climate Problems
logicman

logicman_alf@yahoo.co...
86.147.180.253

This is a first draft based on ideas in these threads:

Washington Times: global warming is a religion

The Vatican's Pontifical Academy of Sciences report

Help with formating to suit the SkS style would be much appreciated.

 

Science and Religion: Allies on Climate Problems


One of the craziest notions being put out by deniers is that climate science is a religion.  Saying that science is a religion is an insult to every scientist, whether, religious or not.  The very thing that separates science from religion is its insistence on not starting from any pre-conceived view of life, the universe and everything.  But divorcing science from religion doesn't mean that science and religion are in opposition.  In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every tribe and tongue, science and religion are staunch allies.

The so-called climate debate isn't, as some would have you believe, a contest between science and religion.  A majority of scientists and a majority of religious people agree that climate change is happening, that the change is human caused and that it is a problem for current and future generations which needs to be addressed by politicians as a matter of urgency.

In November 2009, UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon addressed a gathering of leaders from many faiths. 

"We have technology and the science. Science has made it clear that climate change is happening and accelerating much, much faster than one realises," he said.

"We have know-how and resources but the only vacuum is political will, that is all that is lacking. You can provoke, challenge and inspire political leaders."
...
"It is not a game of who waits for whom. Industrial countries should take the first step." The major faith groups were involved with more than half of the world's schools, they were the third biggest category of investors, they produced more weekly magazines and newspapers than "all the secular press" in the European Union, he added.

"Your potential impact is enormous. You are the leaders who can have the longest, widest and deepest reach."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/nov/03/ban-ki-moon-religious-climate-change

 


Three years ago, the Roman Catholic Church commissioned a report on climate change which will soon be delivered to Pope Benedict XVI.  The scientific report includes these words:


We appeal to all nations to develop and implement, without delay, effective and fair policies to reduce the causes and impacts of climate change on communities and ecosystems, including mountain glaciers and their watersheds, aware that we all live in the same home.

By acting now, in the spirit of common but differentiated responsibility, we accept our duty to one another and to the stewardship of a planet blessed with the gift of life.

We are committed to ensuring that all inhabitants of this planet receive their daily bread, fresh air to breathe and clean water to drink as we are aware that, if we want justice and peace, we must protect the habitat that sustains us. The believers among us ask God to grant us this wish.

We call on all people and nations to recognise the serious and potentially irreversible impacts of global warming caused by the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, and by changes in forests, wetlands, grasslands, and other land uses.

http://www-ramanathan.ucsd.edu/files/PASGlacier.pdf

 


It remains to be seen whether or not the Vatican will issue an official statement on the report's findings.  However, one could easily fill a whole book with statements on climate change which have been issued by the world's religions.  Below are just a few quotes from the many pages of words written by religious groups on the topics of global warming, climate change and environmental damage.


"As American evangelical Christian leaders, we recognize both our opportunity and our responsibility to offer a biblically based moral witness that can help shape public policy in the most powerful nation on earth, and therefore contribute to the well-being of the entire world.

... we must reduce our global warming pollution to help mitigate the impacts of climate change, as a society and as individuals we must also help the poor adapt to the significant harm that global warming will cause."
http://christiansandclimate.org/learn/call-to-action/

 



"We are commanded to love our neighbors, but we cannot love others if we do not support actions that will preserve a healthy environment for them.

Skepticism of the science is increasing today for ideological reasons. Skeptics have been using false knowns in one area to shoot down true knowns in other areas. We have reached a point in our public discussions where arguments are being put forward that are specious and distracting. The same arguments are being used against climate change that were used against the health effects of tobacco."
http://byustudies.byu.edu/blog/post/2010/03/13/Faith-Ethics-and-the-Earth.aspx

 



"We are increasingly aware that the finite nature of the planet’s resources and capacity to absorb waste products places limits on economic growth and consumption. For Christians a response will be informed by principles deriving from the perspective of our faith including those of social justice and of restraint.

Justice needs to be secured for those likely to be most affected by climate change today, in particular those in the developing world. We also have a responsibility to act justly towards members of future generations."
http://www.quaker.org.uk/submission-draft-climate-change-bill-consultation-june-2007



"The Climate Institute has worked closely with faith communities in Australia for several years. In 2006, we approached them to provide moral, ethical and spiritual reasons for why we should take action on climate change. The result was a booklet called “Common Belief” which brought 16 different faith traditions together, including Aboriginal people, Baha’i believers, Buddhists, various Christian denominations and groups, Hindus, Jewish people, Muslims and Sikhs."
http://www.climateinstitute.org.au/faith



"Mammon regrettably has no respect for environmental integrity—nor do his followers. The last 250 years have seen a growing decimation of ever more pristine areas of nature to feed the insatiable industrial cuckoo and its resultant consumerism. Forests—particularly tropical forests—have been systematically hewn down, the seas ransacked, the lands made totally dependent on a host of inorganic fertilizers and pesticides for food production. Wastes galore have filled the seas, the rivers, and the lakes, not to mention the landfills."
from Islamic Faith Statement, Alliance of Religions and Conservation
http://www.arcworld.org/faiths.asp?pageID=75



The Hindu tradition understands that man is not separate from nature, that we are linked by spiritual, psychological and physical bonds with the elements around us. Knowing that the Divine is present everywhere and in all things, Hindus strive to do no harm. We hold a deep reverence for life and an awareness that the great forces of nature-the earth, the water, the fire, the air and space-as well as all the various orders of life, including plants and trees, forests and animals, are bound to each other within life's cosmic web.

"Our beloved Earth, so touchingly looked upon as the Universal Mother, has nurtured mankind through millions of years of growth and evolution. Now centuries of rapacious exploitation of the planet have caught up with us, and a radical change in our relationship with nature is no longer an option.  It is a matter of survival. We cannot continue to destroy nature without also destroying ourselves."
Hindu Declaration on Climate Change
http://www.nhsf.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=709:hindu-declaration-on-climate-change&catid=114:sewa&Itemid=186



"The suffering of the world has been deep. From this suffering comes great compassion. Great compassion makes a peaceful heart. A peaceful heart makes a peaceful person. A peaceful person makes a peaceful family. A peaceful family makes a peaceful community. A peaceful community makes a peaceful nation. A peaceful nation makes a peaceful world. May all beings live in happiness and peace."
from Buddist Faith Statement, Alliance of Religions and Conservation
http://www.arcworld.org/faiths.asp?pageID=66




A majority of scientists say that human-caused climate change is real.  That reality is a matter of grave concern to everyone who cares about their fellow humans of this or of future generations.  It is difficult for any caring person to understand the motives of people - like the Aristoteleans who opposed Galileo - who will not accept even demonstrated facts if those facts contradict their political views that they have a right to pollute and profit.  And so they continue to insist that they are right - and everyone else is wrong - about climate science.  Their cherry-picks and straw men "prove" that science is completely wrong about everything to do with climate.  The ice isn't melting, the planet isn't warming, the oceans are cooling, CO2 is plant food, etc. etc.  Meanwhile, people suffer.

2011-05-10 23:11:15
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
yooper49855@hotmail...
97.83.150.37

Logicman, I can throw this into a blog post format for you later today; too much on the to-do plate this morning.

2011-05-10 23:14:57
logicman

logicman_alf@yahoo.co...
86.147.180.253

Daniel - greatly appreciated, thanks.

2011-05-11 01:41:13comments
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
64.129.227.4

"that the change is human caused and that it is a problem for current and future generations which needs to be addressed by politicians policymakers as a matter of urgency."

"A majority of scientists say that human-caused climate change is real." => There is a scientific consensus that human-caused climate change is real and poses a major threat to our society.

"who will not accept even demonstrated facts if those facts contradict their political ideological views that they have a right to pollute and profit which place wealth and profits above the wellbeing of human and environmental health"

The conclusion could use a little beefing up.  Hopefully John will have a chance to review, since this is up his alley.

2011-05-11 04:45:07
Riccardo

riccardoreitano@tiscali...
93.147.82.137

Link to the Pontificial Academy of Sciences instead of Ramanathan's personal page.

For each quote add a "title" saying who you're quoting.

I'd smooth a little bit the agreement between science and religion. There are too many example of past and present strong opposition (stem cells just to name one). In the first paragraph you should make clear that you're talking just of climate change and environment.

The Vatican has expressed his concerns on climate change (and environmental issues in general) many times (see here for example). There has also been another workshop on climate change a few years ago. A cable released by Wikileaks says that the Vatican was willing to support the Copenhagen Accord.

Given that the Pontificial Academy of Sciences is the official scientific body of the Vatican the statement quoted is already endorsed in practise by the Vatican, don't need to ask for an official statement.

2011-05-11 05:49:30
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
yooper49855@hotmail...
97.83.150.37

Compiled into a blog post for you, logicman.  Incorporated Dana's suggestions and Riccardo's suggested link, but did not address his other recommendations.  Tweaked the ending a bit.

Blog post location:

http://www.skepticalscience.com/Science_and_Religion_Allies_on_Climate_Problems.html

 


 

Science and Religion: Allies on Climate Problems

 

Posted on 11 May 2011 by logicman

One of the craziest notions being put out by deniers is that climate science is a religion.  Saying that science is a religion is an insult to every scientist, whether, religious or not.  The very thing that separates science from religion is its insistence on not starting from any pre-conceived view of life, the universe and everything.  But divorcing science from religion doesn't mean that science and religion are in opposition.  In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every tribe and tongue, science and religion are staunch allies.

The so-called climate debate isn't, as some would have you believe, a contest between science and religion.  There is a scientific consensus that human-caused climate change is real and poses a major threat to our society.  And a threat for current and future generations which must be addressed by policymakers as a matter of urgency.

In November 2009, UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon addressed a gathering of leaders from many faiths. 

"We have technology and the science. Science has made it clear that climate change is happening and accelerating much, much faster than one realises," he said.

"We have know-how and resources but the only vacuum is political will, that is all that is lacking. You can provoke, challenge and inspire political leaders."
"It is not a game of who waits for whom. Industrial countries should take the first step." The major faith groups were involved with more than half of the world's schools, they were the third biggest category of investors, they produced more weekly magazines and newspapers than "all the secular press" in the European Union, he added.

"Your potential impact is enormous. You are the leaders who can have the longest, widest and deepest reach."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/nov/03/ban-ki-moon-religious-climate-change

Three years ago, the Roman Catholic Church commissioned a report on climate change which will soon be delivered to Pope Benedict XVI.  The scientific report includes these words:

We appeal to all nations to develop and implement, without delay, effective and fair policies to reduce the causes and impacts of climate change on communities and ecosystems, including mountain glaciers and their watersheds, aware that we all live in the same home.

By acting now, in the spirit of common but differentiated responsibility, we accept our duty to one another and to the stewardship of a planet blessed with the gift of life.

We are committed to ensuring that all inhabitants of this planet receive their daily bread, fresh air to breathe and clean water to drink as we are aware that, if we want justice and peace, we must protect the habitat that sustains us. The believers among us ask God to grant us this wish.

We call on all people and nations to recognise the serious and potentially irreversible impacts of global warming caused by the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, and by changes in forests, wetlands, grasslands, and other land uses.

The Pontificial Academy of Sciences

It remains to be seen whether or not the Vatican will issue an official statement on the report's findings.  However, one could easily fill a whole book with statements on climate change which have been issued by the world's religions.  Below are just a few quotes from the many pages of words written by religious groups on the topics of global warming, climate change and environmental damage.

"As American evangelical Christian leaders, we recognize both our opportunity and our responsibility to offer a biblically based moral witness that can help shape public policy in the most powerful nation on earth, and therefore contribute to the well-being of the entire world.

... we must reduce our global warming pollution to help mitigate the impacts of climate change, as a society and as individuals we must also help the poor adapt to the significant harm that global warming will cause."
http://christiansandclimate.org/learn/call-to-action/

"We are commanded to love our neighbors, but we cannot love others if we do not support actions that will preserve a healthy environment for them.

Skepticism of the science is increasing today for ideological reasons. Skeptics have been using false knowns in one area to shoot down true knowns in other areas. We have reached a point in our public discussions where arguments are being put forward that are specious and distracting. The same arguments are being used against climate change that were used against the health effects of tobacco."
http://byustudies.byu.edu/blog/post/2010/03/13/Faith-Ethics-and-the-Earth.aspx

"We are increasingly aware that the finite nature of the planet’s resources and capacity to absorb waste products places limits on economic growth and consumption. For Christians a response will be informed by principles deriving from the perspective of our faith including those of social justice and of restraint.

Justice needs to be secured for those likely to be most affected by climate change today, in particular those in the developing world. We also have a responsibility to act justly towards members of future generations."
http://www.quaker.org.uk/submission-draft-climate-change-bill-consultation-june-2007

"The Climate Institute has worked closely with faith communities in Australia for several years. In 2006, we approached them to provide moral, ethical and spiritual reasons for why we should take action on climate change. The result was a booklet called “Common Belief” which brought 16 different faith traditions together, including Aboriginal people, Baha’i believers, Buddhists, various Christian denominations and groups, Hindus, Jewish people, Muslims and Sikhs."
http://www.climateinstitute.org.au/faith

"Mammon regrettably has no respect for environmental integrity—nor do his followers. The last 250 years have seen a growing decimation of ever more pristine areas of nature to feed the insatiable industrial cuckoo and its resultant consumerism. Forests—particularly tropical forests—have been systematically hewn down, the seas ransacked, the lands made totally dependent on a host of inorganic fertilizers and pesticides for food production. Wastes galore have filled the seas, the rivers, and the lakes, not to mention the landfills."
from Islamic Faith Statement, Alliance of Religions and Conservation
http://www.arcworld.org/faiths.asp?pageID=75

The Hindu tradition understands that man is not separate from nature, that we are linked by spiritual, psychological and physical bonds with the elements around us. Knowing that the Divine is present everywhere and in all things, Hindus strive to do no harm. We hold a deep reverence for life and an awareness that the great forces of nature-the earth, the water, the fire, the air and space-as well as all the various orders of life, including plants and trees, forests and animals, are bound to each other within life's cosmic web.

"Our beloved Earth, so touchingly looked upon as the Universal Mother, has nurtured mankind through millions of years of growth and evolution. Now centuries of rapacious exploitation of the planet have caught up with us, and a radical change in our relationship with nature is no longer an option.  It is a matter of survival. We cannot continue to destroy nature without also destroying ourselves."
Hindu Declaration on Climate Change
http://www.nhsf.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=709:hindu-declaration-on-climate-change&catid=114:sewa&Itemid=186

"The suffering of the world has been deep. From this suffering comes great compassion. Great compassion makes a peaceful heart. A peaceful heart makes a peaceful person. A peaceful person makes a peaceful family. A peaceful family makes a peaceful community. A peaceful community makes a peaceful nation. A peaceful nation makes a peaceful world. May all beings live in happiness and peace."
from Buddist Faith Statement, Alliance of Religions and Conservation
http://www.arcworld.org/faiths.asp?pageID=66

There is a scientific consensus that human-caused climate change is real and poses a major threat to our society.  That reality is a matter of grave concern to everyone who cares about their fellow humans of this or of future generations. 

It is difficult for any caring person to understand the motives of people - like the Aristoteleans who opposed Galileo - who will not accept even demonstrated facts if those facts contradict their political views that they have a right to pollute and profit.  And so they continue to insist that they are right - and everyone else is wrong - about climate science.  Their cherry-picks and straw men "prove" that science is completely wrong about everything to do with climate.  The ice isn't melting, the planet isn't warming, the oceans are cooling, CO2 is plant food, etc. etc. 

Meanwhile, people suffer; the ones who suffer the most are also those least able to do anything about the changes in the climate we as a whole have wrought.

2011-05-11 06:18:31
nealjking

nealjking@gmail...
84.151.43.157

I didn't want to go so far as to say that science & religion are "allies", just that they are in agreement on certain points. Scientists ought to take a somewhat "dryer" point of view than religious folk on this matter: They have to be true to the facts first. Let's not make science and religion into a soup.

 

"Science and Religion: Allies on Climate Problems"

=>

"Science and Religion: In agreement on Climate concerns"

 

"But divorcing science from religion doesn't mean that science and religion are in opposition.  In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every tribe and tongue, science and religion are staunch allies."

=>

"But separating science from religion doesn't mean that science and religion are in opposition.  In fact, when it comes to caring for our fellow human beings, scientists and religious people can share common concerns and goals."

 

"as some would have you believe"

=>

"as some ideologues would claim"

 

"threat to our society.  And"

=>

"threat to our society,  and"

 

"Meanwhile, people suffer; the ones who suffer the most are also those least able to do anything about the changes in the climate we as a whole have wrought."

=>

"Meanwhile, people will pay the consequences; the ones who will suffer the most are also those least able to do anything about the changes in the climate that we as a whole have wrought."

2011-05-11 06:59:23
logicman

logicman_alf@yahoo.co...
86.147.180.253

Daniel - thanks.

nealjking - good points, except that it is perfectly permissible to start a sentence with 'And'.  And I do it deliberately to emphasise the fact that the science of linguistics is founded in descriptive grammar and doesn't care a jot about Elizabethan era pedagogical grammar books. :-)

 

Suggested replacement sentence:

In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every tribe and tongue, science and religion are staunch allies.

In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every land, tribe and tongue, science and religion have much in common.  Pain and suffering speak to us in a language that transcends the boundaries of modern science.

 

Suggested replacement paragraph:

It remains to be seen whether or not the Vatican will issue an official statement on the report's findings.  However, one could easily fill a whole book with statements on climate change which have been issued by the world's religions.  Below are just a few quotes from the many pages of words written by religious groups on the topics of global warming, climate change and environmental damage.

One could easily fill a whole book with statements on climate change which have been issued by many of the world's religious groups and thinkers.  Below are just a few quotes from the many pages of words written from a faith-based perspective on the topics of global warming, climate change, environmental damage and our duty of care to our global brothers and sisters.

 

I'll sleep on this and see if I can come up with further improvements tomorrow.  At least: I'd like to think they are improvements. :)

2011-05-11 07:18:46
nealjking

nealjking@gmail...
84.151.43.157

logicman,

I cannot agree with your usage of religious language in the context of scientific discussion: "In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every land, tribe and tongue, science and religion have much in common.  Pain and suffering speak to us in a language that transcends the boundaries of modern science." I do not agree.

And I believe this will be taken as a gift by folks at WUWT that want to paint JC as a religious fanatic already.

2011-05-11 07:35:47
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
yooper49855@hotmail...
97.83.150.37

FYI:  I think I missed incorporating Dana's third suggested revision.

2011-05-11 14:35:05My two cents
James Wight

jameswight@southernphone.com...
112.213.167.138

This site is not supposed to be about religion and I think it is a mistake to bring it up. It was appropriate for John to explain his personal motivations, but this is going beyond that and will tarnish our reputation for objectivity.

Perhaps I should explain my own views on religion – they are very different to John’s. While of course I respect your right, John, to hold the beliefs you do, I don’t agree with them.

I’m an atheist. I don’t believe in any gods because I don’t see any evidence for them. The central problem I have with religion is that it requires belief without evidence, often in the face of contradictory evidence – not a dissimilar psychological mechanism to denial. I'm aware there are plenty of people like you who are both science-minded and religious, but it does not necessarily mean they are compatible. None of us is entirely rational and consistent, particularly on views we may have developed at a very young age. I believe the two systems of knowledge are incompatible: science relies on evidence and does not claim it can ever prove anything absolutely, while religions claim they can derive absolute truths through revelation and ask us to believe them on faith.

John, if your religion is part of what motivates you to fight global warming, albeit for reasons I don’t agree with, I guess that’s a good thing. But I don’t see any evidence that religion results in a net improvement in the world. Quite the reverse: it seems to me that believing things without evidence tends to have negative consequences somewhere along the line.

My problem with referring to statements from religious leaders and religious texts is you can cherry-pick whichever bits you agree with and ignore the bits you don’t agree with. They are also often so vague you can read anything into them – that Buddhist statement doesn’t mention global warming at all. For every Christian like you who sees a duty of stewardship to the Earth, there are others who believe it doesn’t matter what we do to the planet because God created resources for humanity to use, and the Rapture may be imminent. And there’s no way of distinguishing who is right and who is wrong. As for “a majority of religious people” agreeing on climate change – something like 40% of Americans are Young Earth Creationists, and it’s difficult to see how they can coherently accept the science of global warming when they deny the entire paleoclimate record.

To me, preserving a safe climate is an end in itself, not just because some moral authority said so. Countering misinformation is also an end in itself, especially when it affects the future of humanity. Our disagreement on religion doesn’t stop us from working together in a common cause. But I really would prefer that SkS doesn’t take a stance on religion.

2011-05-11 14:51:11
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
69.230.97.203

James, I don't see this as taking a position on religion, I just see it as "here's what religions say" (although I agree the Buddhist statement isn't really applcable).  Since the vast majority of people are religious and could potentially be motivated by these religion positions, I think it's a useful post.

2011-05-11 22:26:09
logicman

logicman_alf@yahoo.co...
109.158.213.53

James, I take your point.

I have discovered in my researches that many of the deniers in powerful political or lobbying positions believe that fossil fuels were formed after the Noachian flood and that the climate before the flood was much the same, hence burning fossil fuels isn't a problem.

Rather than attack this crazy idea and risk alienating people who might see this as an attack on religion in general, I decided to write about the overwhelming number of religious people who accept that our profligate burning of fossil fuels is causing climate change.

I intended this blog to be a report of religious support for climate science.  Perhaps I need to stress more that if people of different faiths can come together and accept scientific evidence, we should ask why the likes of Watts and Monckton do not do likewise.

I welcome any suggestions for a more neutral tone.

If there is any danger of damage to the site's reputation then I agree that this should not be posted.  This is a science site, and much as WUWT believes the opposite, consensus isn't censorship. :-)

2011-05-11 23:29:17
nealjking

nealjking@gmail...
84.151.33.91

I recommend, again, dropping the preaching:

"In fact, when it comes to caring for our sisters and brothers of every land, tribe and tongue, science and religion have much in common.  Pain and suffering speak to us in a language that transcends the boundaries of modern science."

SkS isn't a Sunday service; nor should it be.

2011-05-12 15:25:44Coming to this conversation late
John Cook

john@skepticalscience...
124.187.6.188

Sorry I'm coming in late, this is a very interesting discussion. If I get time (mad week so far!), I'll come back and address some of the more interesting points but just to address the blog post - if we were going to rebut the myth "AGW is a religion", I'm not sure that quoting religious positions is the appropriate way to go. Wouldn't it be more appropriate to go into more detail into how AGW is a science, not a religion - science is based on evidence, we have many lines of evidence (for example... blah blah blah), hence we have a scientific consensus.

Climate denial is about denying the evidence. The "AGW is religion" is just another rhetorical technique to get people thinking about anything but the evidence. Let's point them back to the science. Anyway, that's one suggested approach. Perhaps the religious quotes can be included as an extra point of interest but they are not the main point of the rebuttal to "AGW is religion".

2011-05-12 20:43:38
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.1.168

My two cents:

Reads really kinda preachy, as Nealstradamus points out, and is a bit of a turn-off for me.

I think the post should be structured to puncture the "AGW is a religion" meme, the intent of which is to paint anyone who has religious beliefs as irrational and divorced from reality. This is a canard, and ironic, and we do have a few scientologists onboard (just kidding for those not in on the joke!).

The quotes from religious sectors should be sober, fact based stuff; not emotive. At the end of each quote, you could provide a link to an Sks post/rebuttal.

Maybe the conclusion could be framed around the fact that so many religions accept the scientific reality of global warming, and despite all the evidence, the "skeptics" cling to their incoherent, self-contradictory "non-theory".      

2011-05-12 23:36:40
grypo

gryposaurus@gmail...
173.69.56.151

There is a way to handle this, but I would write it differently.  I think finding ethical similarities in all faiths, then showing how science can help us achieve those ethical goals.  Science and faith are not allied, science is a tool to help us achieve our goals.  There are many examples of how science can be used unethically, and have no connection to faith.

2011-05-13 00:33:42Recommendation
John Hartz
John Hartz
john.hartz@hotmail...
98.122.68.19

If a blog on this topic is to be posted on SkS, it should be a comparative analysis of the salient genertic features of "science" and "religion." In other words, lay out a cogent argument about why defining climate science to be a religion is fundamentally flawed.  

Although I commend logicman for his initiaitve, I do not believe his draft essay should be posted on SkS.

John Hartz