2011-03-28 21:25:07Acidification: Oceans past, present & yet to come
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.204.4

Post here. Typos & suggestions..........

2011-03-29 00:12:56
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
yooper49855@hotmail...
97.83.150.37

Extra periods present at the end of your first paragraph and at the end of the legend for Figure 1.

Suggestions:

Through the burning of fossil fuels, humans are rapidly altering the chemistry of the global oceans, making seawater increasingly more acidic. Most attention to date has focused on what we might expect in the years to come, and rightly so, study after study has shown that the seas of the future are likely to be corrosive to shell-building marine life. Some areas such as the Arctic, might even reach a corrosive state within a decade. But knowing that ocean acidity has increased by almost 30% since the beginning of the industrial civilization; has the change so far already had an effect on marine life?.

to

Through the burning of fossil fuels, humans are rapidly altering the chemistry of the global oceans, making seawater increasingly more acidic. Most attention to date has focused on what we might expect in the years to come, and rightly so: study after study has shown that the seas of the future are likely to be corrosive to shell-building marine life. Some areas, such as the Arctic, might even reach such a corrosive state within a decade. But, knowing that ocean acidity has increased by almost 30% since the beginning of the industrial civilization, has the change so far already had an effect on marine life?.

and

Alongside pollution and increased nutrient run-off from industrial farming, ocean acidification may be another factor in the rapid decline of wild shellfish populations.

to

Alongside pollution and increased nutrient run-off from industrial farming, ocean acidification may be yet another factor in the rapid decline of wild shellfish populations.

2011-03-29 00:24:01
grypo

gryposaurus@gmail...
173.69.56.151

"Most attention to date has focused on what we might expect in the years to come, and rightly so, study after study has shown that the seas of the future are likely to be corrosive to shell-building marine life. Some areas such as the Arctic, might even reach a corrosive state within a decade."

"Most attention to date has focused on what we might expect in the years to come, and rightly so.  Multiple studies have shown that the seas of the future are likely to become corrosive to shell-building marine life. Some areas, such as the Arctic, might even reach a corrosive state within a decade."

***

"Not surprisingly the 750ppm and 1500ppm states induced thinner, smaller and weaker shells, with low rates of survival for juveniles."

"Not surprisingly, the 750ppm and 1500ppm states induced shells that are thinner, smaller and weaker, as well as low survival rates for juveniles."

***

I'd also include the last sentence of the abstract of the paper, or work in how present CO2 emisions will effect populations in the future.  It fits the theme of your post better.  Just a personal preferrence tho.

These results suggest that the ocean acidification that has occurred during the past two centuries may be inhibiting the development and survival of larval shellfish and contributing to global declines of some bivalve populations.

2011-03-29 05:59:53
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.199.149

Fixed, cheers.

2011-03-29 06:13:06
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
yooper49855@hotmail...
97.83.150.37

Bada-bing

2011-03-29 06:30:18suggestions
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
64.129.227.4

My suggested edits in red as well:

"Most attention to date has focused on what we might expect in the years to come, and rightly so; many studies have shown that the seas of the future are likely to be corrosive to shell-building marine life"

"But, knowing that ocean acidity has increased by almost 30% since the beginning of the industrial civilization, has the change so far already had an effect on marine life?." <= extra period at the end

"at various levels of pH representing the global average for specific points in time...late 21st century (750ppm) and late 22nd century (1500ppm)."  It would be worthwhile to explain under what scenario these CO2 levels will be reached.  750 ppm late 21st century (how late?) sounds similar to IPCC SRES scenario A2, which can be briefly described as "a moderate business-as-usual scenario" or something similar.  The key point that we're looking at what will happen if we continue with business as usual.

"Not surprisingly, the 750ppm and 1500ppm states scenarios..."

"Conversely, under pre-industrial levels though (250ppm), the improvement in health and survival was significant.  Shells were much larger..."

"Even under ideal conditions, mortality is high..."

Good post, interesting stuff.  I'm glad to see we're doing more posts on acidification.

2011-03-29 17:47:21
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.208.132

Fixed. Apart from "conversely", trying to simply the lingo a bit, don't want to appear too nerdy. Dana, do you have a simple link for the various emission scenarios? Most are a bewildering mess for the casual reader, especially the IPCC reports.

2011-03-29 18:55:17
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.208.132

Disregard the emissions scenario link, found a good site to link to.

2011-03-29 19:01:31
Glenn Tamblyn

glenn@thefoodgallery.com...
58.166.27.131

Rob

Good Post. Not sure about the use of the word corrosive however. Implies actual attack by acid, and strong acid at that. These effects are about Calcium Carbonate saturation aren't they? The average punter won't know the difference and a skeptic can try to ridicule this as portraying the oceans as actually about to become really acidic. What is another word that conveys this better - dissolution, soluble, solvent??

In the same vein 'more acidic'? It is currently weakly alkaline. I know it is moving in the acidic direction and making an alkali weaker is making it more acidic. But that isn't how Joe Public (or the little red skeptic demon on his shoulder) will read it.

Since this seems to be your stamping ground, another post later on on open ocean species - pteropods etc - and the impacts on them would be good - base of the food chain and all that.

2011-03-29 19:33:54
Rob Painting
Rob
paintingskeri@vodafone.co...
118.93.208.132

Glenn, I hear ya, I know "skeptics" always try to drag that old canard up. "Corrosive" is actually what some surface waters in the Arctic will soon be to shelled marine critters, scientists researching this topic frequently use that term. As far as "acidic", take that up with Ken Caldeira and Michael Wickett. I agree with them though "decreasing ocean alkalinity" doesn't quite have the same ring to it, and certainly doesn't convey the gravity of the situation. Maybe I need some sort of disclaimer at the botton of each OA post?. I don't know how to imbed one.

I plan to cover a few more on oceanic changes, because that is where the real danger lies IMO. And thanks for the approval.

2011-03-30 03:34:01conversely
dana1981
Dana Nuccitelli
dana1981@yahoo...
64.129.227.4

Hehe that's me with my above-10th grade vernacular.  I just can't help myself!

2011-03-30 05:58:29Thanks Rob
John Cook

john@skepticalscience...
124.185.238.238

Have added this to the schedule for tomorrow morning